Uncategorized

223/ Crazy Salad

If I can feel I was responsible for one more orgasm in the world, I feel I deserve the Nobel Peace Prize.  – Jerry Della Femina

I can’t say I’m a feminist. Not even sure I understand what it means to be a feminist.

Here’s the thing: I grew up not having to differentiate one person from the other based on sex or gender. It’s not because I was looking at the world through rose-colored glasses. I think it might be because my Father decided to take an early retirement, which forced my Mother to take on the role of Head of our big Family.

So I grew up with a busy and feisty mother, always trying to make ends meet for the Family. I grew up with a mother who made the important decisions for us children, such as which school we should go to and which profession to pursue. I grew up with a mother who, when she finally had her turn at retirement, was not afraid to fly to Indiana and see what else life had in store for her. In other words, I grew up with an independent woman, a bad-ass chick who was not scared to call the shots when she knew she had to.

Now that I’m old enough to do my own grocery, I don’t look at a product and analyze whether it promotes or degrades a woman, because for me a woman can always choose not to buy it. So I find incredibly amusing, even jokey, Nora Ephron’s essay on how feminine wash became part of capitalism. But I have to remind myself that Ephron wrote “Crazy Salad: Some Things About Women” (The Modern Library, New York), where the feminine wash essay appears, in the early 1970s. Feminism at the time had a war to fight and a battle to wage on so many fronts, not to mention the conflicts within the movement. No such war was internecine or trivial, even if at stake was a feminine wash, because it could mean effecting change in how women are treated and perceived.

Ephron puts together “Crazy Salad” with charm, candor, and wit and, as a result, makes feminism a relatable subject even for a nitwit like me who grew up thinking, thanks to my Mother, women have always ruled the world even from way back when. It helps a lot that she ends her essays with nasty punchlines.

Standard
Uncategorized

05 16 2017.jpg

In the garden of solitude, I hear whispers of regrets and murmurs of discontent, but I feel strangely calm, almost reverent I feel I ought to pray. (Libingan ng mga Bayani, Taguig City/March 2017)

Standard
Uncategorized

05 14 2017.jpg

Erma Bombeck [Motherhood: The Second Oldest Profession]: “All these years, you have been the object of my love and gratitude, frustration and pain, blame and compassion.” (Place des Martyrs, Luxembourg City/February 2015)

Standard
Uncategorized

05-12-2017.jpg

Vultures, right here in this verdant kingdom that stretches to the steely white sky, prey on locals and frequenters under the pretense of collecting revolutionary tax. (Tagum City, Davao del Norte/February 2017)

Standard